Finding Ways to Adjust Through Remote Music Teaching

Transferring from a face-to-face teaching method to remote music teaching due to COVID-19 can be a hard task for music teachers. Different issues might come up on a regular basis that can slow down the entire process. One of the most important issues is finding a good way to properly interact with the student, whether…

Transferring from a face-to-face teaching method to remote music teaching due to COVID-19 can be a hard task for music teachers. Different issues might come up on a regular basis that can slow down the entire process. One of the most important issues is finding a good way to properly interact with the student, whether it be having to buy a microphone and/or a good set of speakers to be able to communicate clearly with the student and also be able to hear what they say and play. However, clear communication is still very difficult since tone of a musical instrument changes significantly while being delivered through a speaker on a computer or a cellphone.

 

Remote music teaching relies primarily on the student’s and the teacher’s access to technology, which sometimes can be a problem because not all families have access to multiple computers or excellent internet connection. This latter issue generates time lags that make it hard to judge a performance. The process of staring at a screen for long periods of time is also an extremely tiring activity – not only for the teacher but also for the student, who could start losing focus and interest. This is especially a concern for younger students.

 

The biggest challenge for remote music teaching comes from ensembles or choirs, where various instruments have to perform simultaneously. Remote teaching doesn’t allow for any opportunity for interaction, for blending of timbres and textures. In a discipline where practitioners rely mostly on their ability to hear, this teaching methodology is very limited.

 

However, experienced music teachers such as Bernie Sherlock, conductor of the prize-winning choir New Dublin Voices at TU Dublin, admit that remote music teaching has to be dealt with. Educators have to find ways to adapt and adjust to these uncertain times. Perhaps this means conducting a mixture of face-to-face and remote instruction. This could include online 1-on-1 lessons, in-person lectures, ensembles of small groups of people, and possibly a combination where (depending on the amount of students) you can have a small amount of students in the classroom while others watch the lecture remotely from home.

 

To learn more about adjusting through remote music lessons, visit the source information at the Irish Times website.

 

Teaching is one of the most difficult things to do, especially when a global pandemic takes away the opportunity to interact face-to-face with the students. At Canyon Entertainment Group, we work to assist those in the music industry who dedicate their lives to educate younger generations and who have a passion for spreading knowledge. To learn about Canyon Entertainment Group, visit www.canyonentertainmentgroup.comor contact us at info(at)canyonentertainmentgroup.com

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